The Library A to Z launches today #LibraryAtoZ

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It’s just over a year since the Library A to Z was first put down on paper – a list of words that reflected the wide range of library services and positive outcomes those services generated. I wrote about it here. Since then, after teaming up with Andrew Walsh to run a crowd-funding project to expand on the original idea and turn it into something more than just a list of words, a set of great promotional and advocacy materials has been produced, including fantastic illustrations by Josh Filhol, posters, cards and a book emphasising the message of the the Library A to Z. The book features a chapter written on behalf on Voices for the Library, along with library users quotes taken from the Voices for the Library site. The Voices team are very pleased that these quotes are being shared outside of our site, as they will help spread the important message that libraries remain relevant in the 21st century.

The Library A to Z is now officially ready to launch and it wouldn’t have been possible without a large number of people helping it reach this point. This includes those who helped create the original list of A to Z words; the 155 financial backers (including major sponsor The Library Campaign); everyone who has shown their support in promoting the A to Z and encouraging people to get involved; the Voices for the Library team; Josh who created the fantastic illustrations that are the centre piece of the A to Z; Aidan who helped with the poster design; and most importantly Andy, who has put in so much hard work from the original discussion we had at Library Camp last year up until the launch.

Even though the materials created by this project have been available for anyone to freely download for a few weeks from the new site at http://libraryatoz.org, the Library A to Z is officially launched this week (17th November).

To highlight the intentions for the launch take a look at the beginning of the book chapter. It leads with:

Over the past few years we have witnessed severe cuts in library service budgets resulting in the reduction of services, most notably by closures, shorter opening hours, staff cuts and the replacement of library staff with typically unsustainable and fragmented volunteer-run services. Cuts are often made in the name of austerity measures, yet in austere times libraries are of particular importance to the disadvantaged in our communities.

For many people the word “library” conjures up images of books and not much more. Although books remain a core feature and are beneficial in many more ways than commonly understood, libraries have a much wider and more significant reach than books alone.

For these reasons politicians at both local and national level (including leading ministers in Government) will be receiving copies of the Library A to Z book and other campaign materials during launch week. The intention is to show them that properly funded and professionally run library services help transform society in many ways, including the improvement of literacy and reading skills, enabling access to digital services, supporting economic growth, promoting wellbeing and education.

Supporters of library services have also been encouraged to send copies of the Library A to Z book and other A to Z materials to their local politicians and media to help spread the message.

At this stage around 90 books have been sent out to politicians and media organisations.

As well as using the materials in this context, the intention is also to encourage library services and their supporters to use them for promotional purposes. For example, editable posters have been created for each letter, so that local information can be added to them. As I have mentioned earlier all of these materials – book, posters, cards, illustrations – are available for you to download and re-use for free.

Whether we are encouraging support from politicians and policy makers or using the materials for promotions in libraries the message remains the same – libraries have so much to offer that most people aren’t aware of. This is a great opportunity for you to let them know.

The launch is being promoted to national and local news and media organisations to raise the profile of libraries. Social media is also being used during the launch to spread the word about the Library A to Z. The hashtag is #LibraryAtoZ.

It would be great if we could encourage you to help spread the message about the Library A to Z during this launch week in whatever way you can.

(Originally posted on www.voicesforthelibrary.org.uk)

More Library Mashups now published #mashlib

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Nicole Engard has published a new edition of her Library Mashups book (More Library Mashups). It includes chapters on tools people can use to create data mashups for libraries and information services, as well as examples of a wide range of actual library data mashups and details about how they were created.

The full run-down of the chapters appear below, so you can get an idea of what is covered. I’ll include a disclaimer here and say I’m fortunate to have a chapter about ifttt.com included in the book too. In fact, it’s also included as a free sample chapter.

  • IFTTT Makes Data Play Easy (Gary Green)
  • The Non-Developer’s Guide to Creating Map Mashups (Eva Dodsworth)
  • OpenRefine(ing) and Visualizing Library Data (Martin Hawksey)
  • Umlaut: Mashing Up Delivery and Access (Jonathan Rochkind)
  • Building a Better Library Calendar With Drupal and Evanced Events (Kara Reuter and Stefan Langer)
  • An API of APIs: A Content Silo Mashup for Library Websites (Sean Hannan)
  • Curating API Feeds to Display Open Library Book Covers in Subject Guides (Rowena McKernan)
  • Searching Library Databases Through Twitter (Bianca Kramer)
  • Putting Library Catalog Data on the Map (Natalie Pollecutt)
  • Mashups and Next Generation Catalog at Work (Anne-Lena Westrum and Asgeir Rekkavik)
  • Delivering Catalog Records Using Wikipedia Current Awareness (Natalie Pollecutt)
  • Mashups and Next Generation Catalog at Work (Anne-Lena Westrum and Asgeir Rekkavik)
  • Delivering Catalog Records Using Wikipedia Current Awareness (Natalie Pollecutt)
  • Telling Stories With Google Maps Mashups (Olga Buchel)
  • Visualizing a Collection Using Interactive Maps (Francine Berish and Sarah Simpkin)
  • Creating Computer Availability Maps (Scott Bacon)
  • Getting Digi With It: Using TimelineJS to Transform Digital Archival Collections (Jeanette Claire Sewell)
  • BookMeUp: Using HTML5, Web Services, and Location-Based Browsing to Build a Book Suggestion App (Jason Clark)
  • Stanford’s SearchWorks: Mashup Discovery for Library Collections (Bess Sadler)
  • Libki and Koha: Leveraging Open Source Software for Single Sign-on Integration (Kyle M. Hall)
  • Disassembling the ILS: Using MarcEdit and Koha to Leverage System APIs to Develop Custom Workflows (Terry Reese)
  • Mashing Up Information to Stay on Top of News (Celine Kelly)
  • A Mashup in One Week: The Process Behind Serendip-o-matic (Meghan Frazer)

I’m looking froward to receiving my copy and I’m sure I’ll be reporting back on some of the ideas featured in it.

Library A to Z – free advocacy & promo material & launch news #LibraryAtoZ

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Andrew Walsh and I are very pleased to announce that the Library A to Z is ready to launch.

The Library A to Z is focused on free promotional and advocacy materials for use by libraries and their supporters, as well as a means of highlighting the economic and social value of libraries to politicians at both local and national levels to encourage continued investment. The key message highlights that modern library services are much more than just buildings containing books – they provide services that support the development and well-being of individuals, the community and the economy. The Library A to Z was funded by 155 generous backers, including key sponsor The Library Campaign, via a Kickstarter campaign during May 2014. We raised £4,543, which was more than twice the basic funding goal.

With this money the organisers commissioned freelance illustrator Josh Filhol to produce full colour images depicting the words that reflect the great work, activities and values of libraries. These illustrations are used as the basis for a range of promotional and advocacy materials including posters, cards and a full colour book. As well as the illustrated library alphabet, the book also includes quotes from library users and a chapter about the positive impacts of libraries.

More details can be found on the new Library A to Z website at http://libraryatoz.org.

The Library A to Z materials including full colour illustrations, posters, book and greeting cards are available for anyone to freely download and use for promotional and advocacy purposes here. Unless otherwise stated, these materials are available to re-use and adapt under a creative commons licence (cc by 4.0). The posters are available as editable Adobe Illustrator files.

The launch of the Library A to Z will happen during the week 17th – 22nd November, when we will send packs including copies of books and other materials to local, national and international politicians. The aim of this action is to highlight the continued importance and value of library services, to encourage continued investment. Prior to this we will also be sending out packs and a press-release to media organisations.

In preparation for this launch we are asking if you could help us get the message out there in any of the following ways:

(1) Think about who you could send/hand-over books, greetings cards etc to yourselves during the launch. For example, this could be a your local MP, or a local councillor with responsibility for libraries (or even all of your local councillors).

(2) Send information about the Library A to Z to your local press and media organisations.

(3) Let your local library service know that the Library A to Z has posters and other materials that can be used freely for promotional purposes.

(4) Promote the Library A to Z online via your own website, blog, e-newsletters, social media accounts in the lead up to the launch. We think it would be particularly effective if you could do this during the launch week, 17-22 November. We are also using the hashtag #LibraryAtoZ to promote it on social media etc.

(5) Promote it offline too – newsletters, library meetings, magazines.

Please don’t feel you are restricted to promoting it in these ways – if you can think of anything else you could do to get the message out there please feel free to do it and let us know. It may be something we haven’t thought of.

We are able to offer a limited amount of professionally printed material (greetings cards, stickers, badges) you can use to promote the Library A to Z during the launch. If you’d like any please let us know as soon as possible via this contact form, providing a delivery address as well as a note about how you plan to use the materials. We would need time to order and distribute the materials before the launch week and we’d want to make sure you had it in time for the launch. Don’t forget there are also materials on the Library A to Z website that you can download and print off yourselves if you prefer. There is also a link on the site where you can order professionally printed materials yourself for a charge. Please note that we have kept costs to a minimum and any profit that is made from them is put back into ordering more Library A to Z materials.

Thank you for your support.

A Focus on Community at the IFLA Public Library Futures conference

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The presentations and papers from IFLA’s Public Libraries conference 2014 held in Birmingham (August 2014) are now freely available online.

I didn’t attend all of the conference, so was pleased I could catch up with the presentations, as the tweeting over the two days it was held in August made it sound like some interesting and practical ideas were being covered.

Out of all the papers available, I thought the following were particularly interesting. I’ve copied the abstracts from the papers themselves.

Multimedia, creativity and new ways of learning: Vaikky, the new mobile library in Espoo, Finland

Välkky is a Mobile Library in Espoo, Finland, a city in the municipality area of Helsinki. The bus includes, among books and other lending material, interactive media technology such as ipads, a video projector and a screen and a big touch screen table. The space can easily be changed according to use. The mobile library Välkky, which started operating in the spring of 2013, is part of the so called Outreach services of Espoo library. These services are two mobile libraries, the other bus Helmi being a more traditional mobile library operating mostly in the afternoons and evenings, the home library , one small hospital library and the Espoo library logistics section. In the mornings the Mobile library Välkky visits schools and daycare centers as a modern children´s library. In the afternoons and evenings Välkky can be changed to a bus for different groups of children and adults, functioning as a writer´s bus, a movie theater, a multimedia workshop, a meeting place for a book club or a handicraft group.

Breaking down barriers between physical and virtual spaces in public libraries: leading practices in Guandong Province of China

The future of public libraries seems foreseeable through leading practices in Guangdong Province, of which the economy development is first ranked and Internet popularity third ranked nationwide. In new buildings, computers are placed in traditional reading rooms together with print collections. On websites, virtual visitors are able to enjoy lectures or exhibitions happening in physical spaces. In Microblog or WeChat communities, netizens not visiting library websites can also be informed. We find that barriers between physical and virtual spaces have been broken down; most of the resources and activities could be accessed by users inside or outside the library.

Let’s tear down the wall between physical and digital: ZLB Topic Room

The Topic Room of the Central and Regional Library of Berlin (ZLB) presents interdisciplinary material from the library’s collection concerned with a certain topical or cultural issue on a monthly basis. In order to cover current topics online information is integrated into the presentation of physical media via the ZLB Topic Room Application on iPads and a Twitter wall. The ZLB Topic Room is a project in which the ZLB cooperates with many different partners.

Bexar County BiblioTech – Bringing the library to the public

BiblioTech Digital Library is the first all-digital public library in the United States, located in Bexar County, Texas. Since the doors of the first branch opened on September 14th, 2013, BiblioTech has actively worked to bridge literacy and technology gaps in San Antonio and surrounding areas by establishing a community presence at the physical locations as well as an online presence through the digital collections and resources. (Taken from www.http://bexarbibliotech.org/)

Community building for public libraries in the 21st century: examples from The Netherlands

Community building is high on the agenda of the public library sector at this moment.
However, there is a lack of innovative examples of community building in the practice of
public libraries. In this article, we focus on two famous Dutch examples of innovative
community building in public libraries. The first example is The Stalwart Readers, a
community of readers, in Dutch called ‘Lezers van Stavast’, guided by librarian Hans van
Duijnhoven. The Stalwart Readers is not a traditional book club, but a community of
readers around a collection of (non-fiction) books selected by the librarian. Every
member is expected to read every week one book (but choice is free: not everyone reads
the same book). Once a month the group comes together and discusses the themes in
the books. The project started in September 2012 and lasted for one year. However,
because of the very positive evaluations by the group members, the community still
comes together. One of the innovative elements of the Stalwart Readers is the fact that
the community also looks outside the boundaries of the library; together, they visit
lectures or theatre plays if there is a relation with the themes in the books. The
community is an example of an innovative way of highlighting the library collection and
providing context around it.

The second example of an innovative public library community is a community formed
around a project called ‘Wisdom in times of crisis’, guided by librarian Marina Polderman.
Unemployed people came together for a period of seven months in 2013, to talk about the values for the 21st century as proposed by philosopher Alain de Botton in his manifest “10 virtues for the modern age” (2013). These values were linked to the library collection and people were asked to link stories to these values and discuss them together. This community shows the library in the 21st century as a place for good conservation.

The main thing that came through with many of these papers was the sense of community linked to these library services, and how those communities cut across both the physical and virtual worlds. In some cases those communities were already in existence, but in others the libraries helped build a community through the services, resources and activities it provided.

 

Open Street Map advice needed in words I understand

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I’ve been asked if I can take a look at Open Street Map (OSM), with the intention of creating a local map that would feature information of an historical nature, rather than current information. I’ve only ever created custom maps like this before using Yahoo Pipes (classification map of the world linked to a library catalogue search) and Google My Maps (a map that displayed works of fiction mentioning local areas). and have never used OSM.

I’m not entirely sure how we’d achieve the same sort of thing (or better) using OSM without getting into some development that we don’t have the skills/money to achieve. After trawling through the wiki it seems as if we would have to set up a hosted site for a customised map; install appropriate map editing and rendering software to populate and display the map with the historical data; and export local current map data from OSM for the area we want to focus on into this customised map.

But I may be wrong.

If anyone can give me any advice I’d really appreciate it.

Signatories of the Lyon Declaration

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The Lyon Declaration was launched by IFLA (International Federation of Library & Information Institutions) a few days ago. In summary:

The Lyon Declaration is an advocacy document that will be used to positively influence the content of the United Nations post-2015 development agenda. It was drafted by IFLA and a number of strategic partners in the library and development communities between January and May 2014.

The Declaration calls upon United Nations Member States to make an international commitment through the post-2015 development agenda to ensure that everyone has access to, and is able to understand, use and share the information that is necessary to promote sustainable development and democratic societies.

At this stage 134 organisations have signed the declaration and for me one of the most interesting things about them is that libraries are sitting there alongside other organisations from around the world focused on human rights, voices for the underrepresented (including youth and women), open communications, cultural development, peace, freedom of expression, freedom of information, free and open internet access, publishers, the importance of IT in sustainable development, democracy, the alleviation of poverty, government transparency, education, and civil participation.

It’s good to see that libraries are in such company.

RFID Considerations for Libraries

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As Technical Librarian I need to keep on top of what is happening in the world of library related RFID. I subscribe to a couple of RFID library discussion lists (UK focus; North American focus) to keep up with activities in other libraries, but we’re also very fortunate in UK libraries, as Mick Fortune has a very informative and supplier neutral site/blog focused on library RFID. On it he raises issues that I hadn’t always considered.

Recently Mick has highlighted a few RFID ideas/issues/points that will be useful to any library service using or thinking of using RFID, and I thought I’d summarise them here and encourage people to follow them up. 

Worldwide RFID in libraries survey

Key points include:

  • The survey covered libraries from all sectors (eg public; academic; school; health), but the highest response was from public libraries. About 200 public library services in the UK use RFID, but not necessarily for all of their stock or all of their libraries.
  • Self-service is still the dominant reason for using RFID, but theft prevention, collection management, access control and acquisition functions also figure highly.
  • Only a small number of respondents used NFC smart-phone or tablet enabled devices. This technology can allow users devices to be used as scanners/readers. Increasing numbers of NFC devices may lead to increased RFID related apps in future.
  • Most respondents use RFID for books, but also CDs/DVDs, Journals, Music scores, laptops (as well as other stock).
  • Most libraries still buy their tags from their RFID supplier, as they did before the agreement of RFID data standards, but buying direct from the manufacturer would give higher savings.
  • ISO 28560-2 is the most popular data standard ie what information is included on the tag.
  • The majority of libraries with RFID use HF (High Frequency) systems, as opposed to UHF (Ultra high frequency).
  • The majority of RFID systems are still relying on SIP to communicate with the LMS, but SIP wasn’t created to work with RFID and therefore has its limitations. SIP allows for the use of extensions to add further functionality. However since the extensions aren’t regulated/standardised they would not migrate well to another RFID system. The newer Library Communications Framework aims to overcome these problems.

The detailed survey responses are very useful (and frank) and identify how libraries use RFID, how they are getting on with it and issues they may be having. It is also a very useful pointer for anyone considering implementing RFID.

BIC guidance on NFC (Near Field Communication)

This document highlights potential issues with NFC – “smartphones equipped with NFC can now read and write data to and from almost all the RFID tags used in the world’s libraries.”. Issues of concern around this technology focus on digital vandalism (ie altering data on the tags), stock theft and data locking.

E.U. Directive on RFID privacy

This expects libraries using RFID to display signs indicating the fact, so that people are aware it is in use in the library. The library would also be expected to undertake a Privacy Impact Assessment to produce a Privacy Impact Statement that would be accessible by anyone who wanted to read it.

If you have any responsibility for RFID or data security I’d recommend you go and read the articles and survey results on Mick’s blog if you haven’t already done so.