MeaningCloud – Extracting Meaning from Content

Standard

I received an email the other day to inform me that Textalytics had changed its name to MeaningCloud. This was really handy, as it reminded me that it existed – I’d signed up for it during the summer, but hadn’t had much of a chance to use it, as I was working on the Library A to Z.

Anyway, it’s something I want to explore more. It’s an online service that analyses the content of text, documents or web pages you supply it with and it highlights key subject, people, places, things and other entities and concepts for you. As a librarian (specifically with my classification head on) I’ve been interested in the idea of automated classification for some time and have tried various experiments including using Yahoo pipes and my recent WordPress snapshot cards to extract meaning from text.

I’ve tested a few other online services like MeaningCloud, but this was the one that seemed the most straightforward and easy to use. The documentation is clear enough for me to understand all I need to and, as I have only really got my head around working with XML output, having this as one of the 2 output options is important to me. It also helps that it’s free up to a certain amount of use.

The way it works is you submit a url containing all the key parameters to the online service:

  • The text, document file, or url of the web page you want to analyse.
  • The type of results you want returned to you (eg sentiment – positive/negative/neutral; text classification – very broad categories such as “libraries and museums”; topic extraction – more detailed subjects and concepts).
  • The output format (eg json or XML).

You can specify more than this and you can define topic dictionaries that are used.

It then returns the information you requested to the service you sent the request from. So, in my case, it would most likely be sent via a program written in Processing. You can then do whatever you want with that response. So, in theory I can develop my WordPress snapshot cards idea to include the subjects, concepts, people, places etc that it returns.

Even though I recognise that analysis tools don’t always pick up on the finer points of text and lack human understanding that is sometimes needed to make complete sense of a piece of text, I like what they can do, and I hope I can do something useful with MeaningCloud.

If you want to try it out, take a look at the demos and enter your own text into the box. The image below shows some of the results it gave me when I entered the text from this blog post. It threw up a couple of odd things “begging” (request) and “boss” (head), but as I say, if you are using it properly you can take the time to set up a dictionary to overcome these sort of issues.

Screenshot of MeaningCloud analysis of blog post

Advertisements

One thought on “MeaningCloud – Extracting Meaning from Content

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s